Category Archives: Employment Based Immigration

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update – August 2014

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update
Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update

August 2014

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Cities and regions can make the most of immigration through local dividends. A recent statement from the Migration Policy Institute’s Transatlantic Council on Migration notes that “well-managed immigration can be a windfall for local economies by creating jobs and fueling growth, fostering innovation, and bringing in new revenue.” But, as the report notes, these benefits are not automatic nor are they evenly accrued. The statement examines ways in which policymakers at all levels can work together and launches a new series of reports on the topic of “Cities and Regions: Reaping Migration’s Local Dividends.” The series will examine “place-based immigration and entrepreneurship policies, city attractiveness, social cohesion, and means to build inclusive cities.” One of the first reports in the series explores ways in which cities and regions can have a voice in immigration policy, which is often set at the national level. Continue reading

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update – June 10, 2014

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New series of fact sheets note brain waste in the workforce, describing U.S. and state characteristics of college-educated native-born and immigrant adults. A new series of fact sheets from the Migration Policy Institute focus on the U.S. and twelve key states with the largest college-educated immigrant populations. The fact sheets assess the extent of “brain waste”: “the number of college-educated immigrant and native-born adults ages 25 and older who are either unemployed or have jobs that are significantly below their education and skill levels.” These fact sheets also describe the “underutilization of education among immigrant and native-born professionals with engineering, nursing, and teaching degrees at the undergraduate level.” 

High-skilled visa denials slowed U.S. tech sector growth, depressing wage and job growth for U.S.-born workers. new report from the Partnership for a New American Economy finds that 2007 and 2008 H-1B visa denials in cities across the U.S. cost U.S.-born workers hundreds of thousands of jobs and nearly $3 billion in missed wages. Specifically, “the high number of H-1B visa applications that were eliminated in the 2007-2008 visa lotteries represented a major lost opportunity for U.S.-born workers and the American economy overall.” Vox.com summarized the report’s findings, stating “when companies have worse luck in getting high-skilled visas, it’s bad news for the tech sector in their city—and especially for US-born computer workers who don’t have college degrees.” John Feinblatt, Chairman of the Partnership for a New American Economy, said“This report shows that the existing cap on H-1B visas is directly undermining our technology industry’s ability to grow and create new jobs for U.S.-born workers.”  Continue reading

American Immigration Council – Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update

Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update
Entrepreneurship and Innovation Update

Latest Research


Study of U.S. metros with most high-tech immigrant entrepreneurs provides lessons for other regions.
A recent post on Immigration Impact highlights a new report from the Kauffman Foundation. The report examines geographic factors that intersect with metro concentration of high-skill immigrant entrepreneurs. According to the report, “an open and culturally diverse environment helps promote high-tech entrepreneurship among both immigrants and the U.S.-born.” As the study notes, “immigrant-owned businesses are more likely to locate in ethnically diverse metro areas that have high foreign-born populations. That’s important for metro areas hoping to attract and retain this fast-growing pool of high-impact founders.” Dane Stangler, vice president of Research and Policy at the Kauffman Foundation, stated, “Because immigrants are far more likely to start businesses—particularly high-tech companies—than the native-born, their importance in the U.S. economy is increasing.”

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H-1B PETITIONS

“WASHINGTON—U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) announced on April 7 that it has received a sufficient number of H-1B petitions to reach the statutory cap of 65,000 visas for fiscal year (FY) 2015. USCIS has also received more than the limit of 20,000 H-1B petitions filed under the advanced degree exemption.

USCIS received about 172,500 H-1B petitions during the filing period which began April 1, including petitions filed for the advanced degree exemption. On April 10, 2014, USCIS completed a computer-generated random selection process, or lottery, to select enough petitions to meet the 65,000 general-category cap and 20,000 cap under the advanced degree exemption. For cap-subject petitions not randomly selected, USCIS will reject and return the petition with filing fees, unless it is found to be a duplicate filing.

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